How to Build a Java eCommerce Site from Scratch In 2020

By Dan Barraclough | Updated: 29 April 2020

During the COVID-19 pandemic, the best way to communicate with your customers and clients is online. Whether you’re looking to sell your products or services over the web, show off your creative work, or simply get your company’s name and details out there – the first thing you need to do is set up a website. Fortunately, DIY website builders enable you to set up your own website quickly and easily – and they’re pretty inexpensive, too.

In these unusual times, we understand that time is money. That’s why we’ve done all the research for you – testing and comparing top website builders on priceease of usefeatures, customer support, and more so you don’t have to. We’ve selected and reviewed our five favourite builders for businesses like yours – check out our quickfire comparison of those website builders here.

Building an eCommerce website from scratch may not be as difficult as you envisage. Using the right eCommerce platform and CMS tools, you can create effective, working websites to help you boost sales and create a great user experience for the customer.

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What is Java?

As an autonomous computing platform, Java programming is both high-performing and secure. One of its strongest assets is that Java can run from most platforms regardless of your computer architecture. It is used to develop effective programs that run within most web browsers, allowing you to create your eCommerce website and have the confidence that it will run everywhere. The versatility of Java means you can save time and money in the long-term as there will be a reduced need to tailor your site for different platforms and browsers.

Building your Java eCommerce

Choose the right Java eCommerce provider

This is crucial for ensuring that you are able to create eCommerce sites suitable for your needs. Some platforms such as Elastic Path and Broadleaf Commerce are specially designed to use Java to create your site. Expert Market can help further by selecting the best providers for your needs.

How advanced is your knowledge of coding practices?

Creating the most effective eCommerce sites using Java will require a knowledge of code. Whilst you can learn this from books and online resources, it may not provide you with the timely solution you’re looking for. It may be worth using an easier eCommerce platform or hiring a web developer to create your site instead.

Think about which features you’d like to include

This relates to the number of products you will be looking to sell, the number of categories available and images used as well as features such as searches and customer reviews. Most eCommerce platforms will provide you with easy ways to incorporate these into your site and will allow you to set it up quickly and easily.

Choose your payment methods

The more payment options you choose, the more flexibility you can offer customers. Use add-ons provided by companies such as PayPal in order to add payment options to your website to allow your customers to pay for goods and services using their preferred methods. You will also need to set up how your business would like to receive these accounts.

Testing

Ensure that your eCommerce site works properly by performing test checkouts to try out all of the functions. Once you’re satisfied that everything is in order you can launch your site.

Next steps

The more you get used to using Java for creating eCommerce sites, the better your website will be. Start off by mastering the basics and you’ll soon be moving to more advanced features.

To work with a professional web design agency on your eCommerce website, enter your details into the webform at the head of this page. We'll contact you to talk through the specifics of what you need and then Expert Market will connect you to the best suppliers for your business.

Dan Barraclough

Dan’s a writer for Expert Market, specialising in a range of cool topics. He loves web design and all things UX, but also the hardware stuff like postage metres and photocopiers.

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